A Candle In The Wind…


Eternal sex-kitten, wide-eyed almost childlike innocence, a woman that men lusted after, dreamt of and still to this day is remembered as an iconic beauty, that many have tried to replicate but failed to capture the enigma that was Marilyn Monroe.  Many have specualted that Marilyn born Norma Jean Mortenson had BPD.  As a child, Norma Jean was shifted from foster home to foster home after her mother suffered psychotic breaks and was in and out of institutions. ABANDONMENT.  However trouble followed Norma Jean throughout the homes she was placed in.  Living with Gladys’ best friend Grace McKee and her husband Doc Goddard was short lived after he nearly sexaully assaulted young Norma Jean. SEXUAL ABUSE.  From there on she lived in different foster homes until finally marrying James Dougherty at the age of 16, to find a sense of stability in her life.  In her autobiography Norma Jean she stated that she did not feel like a wife, instead enjoying to play with the neighborhood children. ARRESTED EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT    When James a merchant marine was shipped out to the Pacific, Norma Jean  lived in fear that he would not return. FEAR OF BEING ALONE and moved in with Dougherty’s mother.

It was at this time that Norma Jean began to fade and Marilyn would emerge.  She was given a modeling contract, told to change her hair color and name and so she did.  CHAMELEON LIKE QUALITIES.  Though her persona changed her childlike qualities did not.  One of her first directors commented on a certain innocence he found in her.  Nose job, overbite softened, Marilyn Monroe one of the 6 greatest film stars was born.  But, the damaged child still lay inside..  In a 1952 edition of True Magazine, Marilyn was on the cover portrayed in a wholesome light with the caption “Do I Look Happy?  I Should.  For I was A Child that Nobody Wanted.” (The core of BPD , the wound of abandonment).  The media created her success into a Cinderella story, but the fairy tale did not end happily ever after.  Marilyn went on to have a successful modeling and movie career.  One of her co-stars Jane Russel once described this sex-symbol admred by all as shy. FEAR

Marilyn admitted to having a fear of large crowds. FEAR ANXIETY DISTRUST and was rumored to stay in her dressing room for hours before performances because of stage fright.  Many critics of that time commented on her sexual overtness SEXUAL PROMISCUITY and failed to recognize her for the dramatic actress she wanted to be.  Norma Jean became a puppet for the fans and directors that controlled her.  She took parts she didn’t want, in an effort not to dissapoint.  WANTING ACCEPTANCE   Monroe married three times  UNSTABLE RELATIONSHIPS    and was said to have suffered a miscarriage.   During her marriage to Arthur Miller, her health detiriorated and she began seeing a psychiatrist Dr. Ralph Greeson, she complained of insomnia.  After which he prescribed medication.  Inevitably Monroe became heavily addicted to vsiting medical doctors to get an excessive variety of drugs.  Miller and Monroe began having public arguments ANGER and she complained that he did nto do enough to help her. VICTIMIZATION

She became increasingly difficult to work with , many actors recall hostility and having to wait long periods for her to make her appearance.  During one of her movies with Clark Gable , whom she used to fantasize was her father during her childhood, Gable suffered a heart attack.  Monroe was distraught with guilt, feeling she had treated him badly on the set. GUILT  Monroe became increasingly dependent on alcohol and prescription medication DRUG ADDICTION and checked herself into Payne Whitney, later transferred to Columbia Presbyterian.

After her release she interviewed with Life Magazine in which she shared her uncertainties about her relationship with her fans and her status as “star” and “sex symbol”.  LOST SELF  Rumors of an affair with John Kennedy, she made her last public debut singing Happy Birthday to him at a party.  Allegedly he broke off the affair leading her to even greater despair and perhaps into the arms of Robert Kennedy  FEAR OF BEING ALONE. August 5, 1962, Marilyn was found dead in her home by an apparent overdose.  To the world she was Marilyn – sex symbol, mega movie star, she had what anyone could dream of, but to those who knew her such as Harry Weinstein a director she worked with this exuberant, bubbly personality lived in fear.  “Very few people experience terror, we all experience anxiety, unhappiness, heartbreaks, but that was sheer primal terror.”  Never officially diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, in an era in which it was not recognized, Marilyn Monroe exhibited many classic symptoms.  A childhood marked by tragedy she was manufactured into a persona which even she did not recognize or feel comfortable with…inevitably this flame was diminished long before its time…

“Fame will go by, and, so long, I’ve had you fame.  If it goes by, I’ve always known it was fickle. So, at least it’s something I experienced but that’s not where I live.”  Norma Jean Mortenson (Marilyn Monroe)

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2 Responses

  1. excellent article i had no idea what BPD is ? thank you for the education , i will try to help spread the word many people assume that it’s the person who is responsible for there behavior . Thanks!

  2. BTW, according to some who have commented, that Marilyn was in fact diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, however as I have researched and read, she was never officially diagnosed, but according to Marilyn’s Internist, Dr. Engelberg, Marilyn was bi-polar. She suffered from extreme highs and lows that would come on suddenly and impulsive behavior, alcohol and drug abuse. Marilyn’s symptoms also fit “borderline personality disorder” with her inability to sustain long term relationships, anger fits, “black and white” thinking, mood swings and fear of being abandoned.
    The cause of all this was most likely genetically as well as her unstable upbringing.
    I hope this helps.

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